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Hyperventilating

Thread starter #1
I have suffered from generalized anxiety for over 20 years. Most recently it has manifested as chronic hyperventilation. It feels kind of like a toned down, drawn out panic attack but not as severe. Nevertheless, it is very uncomfortable and tiring. It seems to come on for a couple weeks at a time. Has anyone else dealt with this? I would be interested to hear about your experience. Thanks.


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#2
I have suffered from generalized anxiety for over 20 years. Most recently it has manifested as chronic hyperventilation. It feels kind of like a toned down, drawn out panic attack but not as severe. Nevertheless, it is very uncomfortable and tiring. It seems to come on for a couple weeks at a time. Has anyone else dealt with this? I would be interested to hear about your experience. Thanks.


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Hiya @Shoozer

I find the best way to calm the body down when having an anxiety attack is to take a deep breath. Hold it in and let it out slowly. It really does work. It won't stop attacks from coming, but it will calm down the one you are in at that moment.
 

Kelculator

Active Member
#3
Try to be patient with yourself, and connect with your emotions whenever you feel anxious. Distractions work sometimes, pep talks, self-help videos... You are not alone. There are many methods for you to get through this, and we are here for you. I know how dreadful it can be, I had this about a year ago, and I was just driven crazy. It gets better. Welcome to the community!
 
#4
I can for sure relate. I've often been feeling like I cannot take a full breath if anything slightly stressful happens. it is very scary and all tiring because I focus so much on it and my breathing that the over breathing starts to hurt my chest. If I am distracted I don't notice it really but it is very difficult to convince myself it is not a more serious health problem other than anxiety.
 
#5
I've often been feeling like I cannot take a full breath if anything slightly stressful happens
It is hard I know to take a breath when you are in the midst of an attack. Especially when the chest tightens it's really difficult to get any air in. The way to do it is to purse your lips like you are going to kiss, or like you are breathing through a straw. Don't gape open your mouth because that doesn't work. Take in the air slowly and hold it in for as long as you can and let it out slowly. Even get yourself a straw to hand. Holding the air in gets the air around your lungs and so into your bloodstream. That means your heart doesn't have to work as hard to pump air around your body.
 

Kelculator

Active Member
#6
It is hard I know to take a breath when you are in the midst of an attack. Especially when the chest tightens it's really difficult to get any air in. The way to do it is to purse your lips like you are going to kiss, or like you are breathing through a straw. Don't gape open your mouth because that doesn't work. Take in the air slowly and hold it in for as long as you can and let it out slowly. Even get yourself a straw to hand. Holding the air in gets the air around your lungs and so into your bloodstream. That means your heart doesn't have to work as hard to pump air around your body.
That's good advice, I can see it being able to help. I am going to try and use this method.
 
#7
I have suffered from generalized anxiety for over 20 years. Most recently it has manifested as chronic hyperventilation. It feels kind of like a toned down, drawn out panic attack but not as severe. Nevertheless, it is very uncomfortable and tiring. It seems to come on for a couple weeks at a time. Has anyone else dealt with this? I would be interested to hear about your experience. Thanks.


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Chronic hyperventilation syndrome is a legitimate respiratory disorder that has physiological (not just psychological) causes. You have a pulmonary disorder, Shoozer, so I think you should see a pulmonologist about how to treat this. You may need to be prescribed an inhaler to use. I'm sorry that you experience this. It is very distressing, no doubt.

Do you have a history of allergies like hay fever, or suffer from asthma already? If you do, this could be related to both of those. Also, have you found any breathing exercises that help you? http://www.familydoctor.co.nz/categ...tilation-syndrome-breathing-pattern-disorders

Below are some breathing exercises which will help you learn to breathe deeply. It is important that you breathe in and out at a steady rate and that you do not have to try too hard.

Exercise 1:
Practice your breathing when sitting or lying in a comfortable position.
Imagine your lungs are divided into three parts. Breathe in gently through
your nose. Imagine the lowest part of your lungs filling with air.

If you are using your diaphragm your stomach will come out a little. Imagine the
middle part of your lungs filling with air and your lungs becoming
completely full. Your shoulders may rise slightly and move backwards.
Gently and slowly exhale fully and completely. Repeat the exercise three
or four times.

Exercise 2:
Take a deep, full breath. Exhale slowly, fully and completely. Inhale again
and count from 1 to 4 (or for as long as feels comfortable). Pause for a few
seconds. Exhale slowly while counting from 1 to 4 (or for as long as feels
comfortable). Repeat the exercise three or four times.
 
Thread starter #8
Thanks for the advice! I do have allergies and a history of asthma as a child. I am not wheezing so I never linked the two but I guess it is something to consider.


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#9
Research has been done to show a link between asthma and anxiety disorders. My family all have asthma and allergies and my siblings all have anxiety problems (my brother treats his with an SSRI, my sister doesn't treat hers, our mother is on several SSRIs and Benzos, and I have tried Benzos but am trying to use nutrition and sleep and cognitive therapy to deal with my anxiety disorder).

If only more doctors and psychologists would ADMIT there is a biological link between asthma and anxiety, less people would feel shame about having anxiety to begin with. I think it's a disservice to people with anxiety disorders to label anxiety as a mental illness, when in fact, anxiety disorder is a physiological side effect of having allergies and asthma. For god sakes, science proves this to be true. All I had to do was an internet search "anxiety and asthma" and tons of article links populated.

https://www.ponderapharma.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Panic-Disorder-and-Asthma-Carr-1999.pdf

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15184694

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0954611106002447

https://anxietypanichealth.com/2008/12/04/asthma-linked-to-anxiety-disorders/
 
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