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What Impact does it give you when diagnosed with a mental health issue?

Poser

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Most probably, there is a certain effect to people when they are told/ diagnosed that they have a mental health issue. If it would be me, I would be very conscious to how I think, and maybe seek second opinion so I can confirm if the diagnosis is accurate. How about you? What if you were diagnosed with a mental health issue? How will you react?
 

Alex

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I think many people on this board may have been diagnosed and I was told I had severe clinical depression. Usually when you get to that stage you know it's true because you are seeking help and it's not so much of how you react, it's more of,'So what's next?" you ask them.


For people who aren't sure if they have mental health issues, perhaps they need therapy instead. The more you learn about mental health you realize that many people have had some issues, and most nip it in the bud or seek help early on before it gets out of control, or they were lucky to have support so it did not develop.


The hardest step for many people is taking that step to see a doctor, as it's hard to muster the energy to go. In answer to your question, most people already know they have some issues to resolve and all they want to hear is how to solve things. Technical terms mean little when you just want to feel better.
 

John Snort

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Seeking a second opinion after you get a diagnosis might be a good idea but the fact that you had doubts and had to talk to a professional to find out if you have a mental illness should be proof enough that at the very least you should take action: start taking (prescribed) medication, try natural remedies, get some therapy, etc — anything that will help you combat the mental illness before it gets worse. That's what my reaction would be — deal with the mental illness or learn how to best cope with it.
 

It'sJaz

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I'll first read up on what I have been diagnosed with. If I think the diagnosis is accurate then I won't do anything. If not, I'll probably get a second opinion if it matters, like if I have been prescribed meds. I won't mind having the diagnosis because it's easier for others to understand my behaviour better.
 

EntropiaAddict

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When I was diagnosed with severe clinical depression, as @Alex said, it was more of a "OK, so what do I do about it?" type of situation. I had gone to see a professional because I could tell something was off with me compared to other people. After meeting with professionals for several years, I have also been diagnosed with OCD, ADHD, PTSD, and mild social anxiety. I would say that if a professional is diagnosing you and prescribing medication after a meeting or two and you are not comfortable with that, then definitely seek a second opinion. However, also realize that if you have been seeing a professional for a while, they are a professional and better equipped to understand what your issues are than you are. The problem with searching the internet for mental disorders is that, while some things are in common, mental disorders tend to affect different people differently. From my experience, professionals don't like to just prescribe medication to make the problem go away, but would rather keep you on the lowest dosage possible to get you through the worst of your symptoms. So, if they are prescribing medication, it is more of a "Let's see how much this helps" and not a "I wonder if this will do anything" type of situation.
 
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kimmie216

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I felt as though the diagnosis I received was a confirmation for what I was feeling. It was validation for me that I knew what I was talking about. I've listened to people tell me to relax my whole life and it has been frustrating because I knew that it wasn't simply a question of relaxation. Others don't understand that anxiety and OCD have a biological component as well. Yes, I needed to work on strategies, but I also needed medication to help me relax to learn those strategies. The diagnoses made me feel more assured that I was doing the right thing as far as treatment was concerned. Certainly if I was diagnosed with something that I questioned, I would explore a second opinion as well. In my case, I didn't need to though.
 

listener1987

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As other said on this thread, my dx was a HUGE relief! Suddenly I knew I had a medical problem, and I wasn't crazy, and there were solutions. Of course, the solutions ended up taking a long time, through trial and error and a lot of effort. But it was so worth it, because I have been relatively free of depression for about five years now. I do have small relapses, but nothing compared to the ongoing depression I used to experience! For me, the solution was medication, which I have no problem with. In my opinion, if I have a chemical imbalance in my brain, no amount of positive thinking is going to fix that (though it is certainly necessary to take care of health and well-being!)


So my diagnosis validated the previous miserable years and helped me feel strong.
 

Azelma

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When they finally gave me an actual diagnosis, I felt relieved. At last, I have a name for what's been wrong with me all these years! It gives perspective, it gives you the feeling of not being completely alone and crazy (because if there's a name for your condition, it's not just your condition). I had of course been browsing through Wikipedia and other sites and checking which symptoms correlate with my experiences - and turns out I diagnosed myself correctly when it comes to my personality disorder. Only after finding this out do I feel like I have any actual chance of changing the way I am, because now I know what's wrong with me and I can look for support in how other people have dealt with it.


Of course, most of the credit goes and will go to my awesome therapist  :smile:
 
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17emilyhalko

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I was diagnosed with anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, and manic depression. When I was younger (a freshman in high school) I remember a friend telling me that they genuinely thought that I was depressed, and they told me that they would help me through it. I didn't want to believe them, really, I was in denial. I kept getting worse and worse, though. Finally, when I was diagnosed a little less than a year ago, I was reassured in a way. It meant that I got help for my problem and have been able to work on my problems. I feel a lot better than I did a year ago! If you haven't been diagnosed, then you should try to be diagnosed. I think that we all have a feel for our bodies and that we know our situation and problems more than anyone else, but being diagnosed is a step closer to help.
 

Mewallison

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After being diagnosed with bipolar disorder about a year ago at 17, I was completely shocked, but everyone who was a part of my daily life thought it made sense. By the time I was diagnosed, my mental instabilities had already damaged so many aspects of my life, such as relationships with friends, family, past boyfriends, and my academics. But I did finally have an explanation for my behaviors throughout my life. After reflecting, I believe I've been bipolar since a very young age. One of the only reasons I even made it to a doctor to address the issues was because of a boyfriend that pushed me to the point where my symptoms had been worse than ever before, and I also think that outside factors definitely make a difference in how well you're (or maybe just me) able to cope, and having such an unhealthy relationship in my life where I was told that I just needed to control it when I didn't get that choice (or else I OBVIOUSLY would have) by the person who told me I needed to go get medical help in the first place, but apparently it's a hard concept for people who don't struggle with a mental illness to grasp. I've been told countless times that I don't "seem" bipolar, and think it's a synonym for crazy or something. I feel so much better than I did a year ago for a combination of reasons, like medicating and ridding myself of toxic relationships, and I really hope that I can show the people that I'm surrounded by on a daily basis that my diagnosis isn't necessarily a bad thing.
 

gwood

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When I was first diagnosed with depression, I was not shocked or worried. The reason was, I was not even properly aware what depression actually is. All I thought was okay, may be I am just sad/worried a lot, no big deal, happens with a lot of people, how is this a disease? Then as time passed, I slowly realized how big a deal it was.If I was diagnosed today, it probably would impact me hugely, as I know the implications now.
 

jaden11218

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I was never diagnosed with anything because I never consulted a doctor about my possible problems, but I know what I'd do if I had been. I would first be looking up my diagnoses to see if it looked accurate to me. Then I would see what I needed to do next. I never went to a doctor because I didn't want their help. If I went and got a diagnoses, it would've been because I wanted treatment. I would expect them to help me, whether it be through medication, therapy, or whatever other treatment that may work. To actually be diagnosed, I would feel a little crazy, but also like "I knew it!" because something just had to be wrong with me to be this different. I'd feel like my thoughts and behaviors were justified if there was actually a diagnoses.
 

misszerable

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If I am diagnosed with a mental health issue after submitting myself to tests, I'll be brave enough to ask the doctor what's next, what can I do about it? I think a mental health issue is easier to treat than cancer. I have a cousin who is battling bipolar disorder. He wasn't aware of it and he would often go from one mood to the opposite mood in seconds. There were times when he was sweet and caring and times when he had a short temper. His wife and his kids left him when on a fit of anger, he pointed a bow and arrow at his son. This prompted him to seek help and have himself diagnosed. The doctors gave him maintenance medicine and it has helped stabilize him. 
 

kgord

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I don't know that I have formerly been diagnosed with anything other than moderate depression, although I know I am clinically depressed. My depression comes and goes though, and I have good days and bad days. The thing with me though, is the road to improve my circumstances is not easy, nor clear, and it seems like anytime I make a little progress, I end up back down in the ditch again. I should be able to do better, but I just can't seem to stay motivated or even care.
 

janemariesayed

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It dosesn't make me think I am a worse person or a bad person. It doesn't make me think to myself that I am crazy or something. As I have got older I can recognise that people I have known in my life have thought of me as a bit strange. But that is because the subjects I enjoy are not the normal run of the mill subjects. I can't find conversation with people because of it but I don't think of myself as the one who is in the wrong.

I admit I have problems mentally, but it is hardly surprising considering what I have been through. I don't care what some may think because it wasn't down to me that I feel this way.
 

Dragonfly1

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A diagnosis of a mental illness/condition doesn't mean it's the end of the world. For many people, it can lead to denial, for others it may bring peace of mind in knowing the reasons for why they feel the way that they do.
Personally, when I was diagnosed with anxiety disorder and Meds were suggested, I was not thrilled about having to "depend on medication". However, after taking it for a while, feeling my symptoms decrease, and going to counseling, I was greatly relieved.
Certainly it will impact each person differently, as we are not all the same.
 
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